Can a bad car crash that I was in cause panic/anxiety disorder?

I’ve always had bad panic attacks sometimes, but I got in a pretty bad car wreck last week and they’ve gotten worse and more frequent. My hands are shaky, my breathing is heavy, and I can feel my heart pounding. Then I start feeling dizzy, worried, etc…Is this just panic caused by my wreck? And if so, how long will it last this bad? Could it be something else, or is it all in my head?

Hi Elliott,
I’m sorry to hear about the car accident you were in. It sounds like your panic disorder has worsened your panicky nature. Were you physically injured in the accident? If not, then get back into a vehicle and conquer your fears. Start by getting into a car and just sit there for a few minutes. Then have a driver take you around the block and back home. Remember that old saying about getting back on the horse that threw you? Well, in psychological terms, it’s called "exposure therapy". It’s really just common sense. Face your fears or they will end up conquering you. The sooner you begin the better.

7 Responses to Can a bad car crash that I was in cause panic/anxiety disorder?

  1. help101 says:

    Yes it can. You need to tell someone, if you have a therapist tell them so that they can help you. I have made a support site you should check out. it might help. http://selfhelp.yuku.com
    References :

  2. Rail-Rocker says:

    it’s called ptsd..depending on the individual and the event ptsd is kinda common now.
    References :

  3. Honeyface says:

    What you are suffering is called PTSD. Post traumatic Stress Disorder. Plus if you were already predisposed to panic attacks or some sort of anxiety disorder, the PTSD will manifest even more solidly. How long will it last? It could last and progress into other, worse symptoms, if you don’t get help with it now. I know volumes about PTSD, and you absolutely must get help with this. It is very important. The anxiety and panic will not kill you, but it will make you feel like you’re going to die. Then, it gains more and more power over your mind and body until you really have trouble functioning on many levels. Please get help. It’s never too late, but it’s never too soon, either. Good luck.
    References :
    Mental Health Provider for 20+ years.

  4. Alexis says:

    Hi Elliott,
    I’m sorry to hear about the car accident you were in. It sounds like your panic disorder has worsened your panicky nature. Were you physically injured in the accident? If not, then get back into a vehicle and conquer your fears. Start by getting into a car and just sit there for a few minutes. Then have a driver take you around the block and back home. Remember that old saying about getting back on the horse that threw you? Well, in psychological terms, it’s called "exposure therapy". It’s really just common sense. Face your fears or they will end up conquering you. The sooner you begin the better.
    References :

  5. Holly K says:

    I’m so sorry to hear this. Bad car accidents can absolutely cause panic attacks and even Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). I was in a terrible car accident seven years ago (it was a head on collision and both cars were totaled). I had issues with panic attacks as a result of the accident. I went to see a psychiatrist about it, and I decided that I did not want to start a medication daily for it, but I did get a prescription for a medication for my panic attacks that helped greatly.

    As for how long it will last, I can’t answer that. This is something that varies greatly from person to person. I do think that seeing a counselor or mental health provider can help with your situation. They can help you learn to deal with your panic attacks better.
    References :

  6. Stacy-here says:

    Do You Feel Any Of The Following Bodily Sensations?

    •Dizzy spells leading to panic
    •Tightness in throat and chest- shortness of breath
    •Racing heart with tingle sensations
    •Hot flushes followed by waves of anxiety
    •Obsessive worries and unwanted thoughts
    •Not feeling connected to what is going on around you
    •Overwhelming fear that the anxiety will push you over the edge?
    You Must Learn To Break The Fear Of Having Another Panic Attack Or You Will Never Experience Complete Freedom From Anxiety

    -The anticipation of a panic attack starts the wave cycle of anxiety in motion.

    -The foundation of a future panic attack is laid hours before you actually experience one.

    -The slightest stress trigger will then launch the full blown panic attack into motion.

    -Panic manifests itself in approximately 20 minute wave like formations.

    There is one key factor that makes the difference between those who fully eliminate panic attacks from their lives and those who do not. The key ingredient is not medication, lifestyle changes, or relaxation exercises. It is when the individual no longer fears the thought of having a panic attack..

    This may seem like a simplified and obvious observation but give it careful consideration. The one thing that has you searching for a solution to anxiety and panic attacks this very moment is the fear of having another one.

    The first time a person experiences a panic attack it can feel like their world is falling down around them. Nowhere feels safe as the anxiety becomes like a stalker lurking in the background.
    When this happens people begin to either avoid situations that make them anxious or they medicate themselves to the point where they are numb to the fear. I am sure you will agree neither of the above is a satisfactory solution.
    For a solution see
    http://find-it-hereonline.com/Page2.html
    References :
    http://find-it-hereonline.com/Page2.html

  7. shelob says:

    It is natural to feel some some anxiety over a period of time after you experience trauma. It only becomes PTSD when it has been going on for an irregular amount of time. If you get treatment soon, you may be able to stop it from progressing. Here is some info on PTSD and symptoms. http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1743146/symptoms_of_posttraumatic_stress_disorder.html?cat=5
    References :

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